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The Weber Larger Mandolin Family Body Shapes

By Michael Eck The first great wave of mandolin madness hit American shores early in the 20th century, with Ellis Island as the gateway, and European masters and amateurs serving as ambassadors. Years before Bill Monroe played his first lick, mandolin orchestras roamed the land, popping up in urban centers and small towns alike. Some petite ensembles played jaunty classical pieces or nostalgic airs of home—often Italy and Germany. Other large groups favored popular melodies of the day,...

An In-depth Look at The Dovetail Neck Joint

There’s more than one way to join wood. Just ask Marty Lewis. Lewis, the luthier who puts the neck on your Weber mandolin, has a long history in woodworking (which we’ll cover here in depth, soon), and he knows what’s what when it comes to maple, mahogany and spruce. When Weber owner Tom Bedell stood next to Lewis while holding a classic mandolin from the 1920s, Bedell immediately knew he wanted to add a traditional dovetail to the catalog, and he knew he had the man to do it...

MMR Article: Advancing the Traditional Weber Mandolins

MMR Article: Advancing the Traditional Weber Mandolins

Written by Victoria Wasylak Published: 09 April 2018 | Read Full Article In 2018, many musicians and retailers have complex feelings about guitar sales and their relevance in today’s market, while ukuleles continue to have an epic moment and are surging in popularity. So where do mandolins fit into the equation? As it turns out, the answer is “perfectly.” Weber Mandolins, now under the Two Old Hippies brand roof with Breedlove Guitars and Bedell Guitars, relocated from...

Meet the Craftsmen: Dalton Bell

By Michael Eck Dalton Bell starts his day in the spray booth, but even when his body has left the clean, dust-free room at the rear of the shop on Bend’s American Loop, his head is still in there. Bell has an artistic sensibility that flows out and through everything he touches, whether it’s a painting he’s making at home, a new song he’s developing on guitar and keys, or your Weber mandolin. A native Oregonian, born in Bend and raised in La Pine, Bell has done his...

An Indepth Look at Weber Finishes

An Indepth Look at Weber Finishes

By Michael Eck The finish on your Weber mandolin speaks to everyone in the room—or the festival tent or the club or the concert hall—even before they hear the first note. It telegraphs quality. It signifies the instrument as an object of beauty, craftsmanship and virtuosity. You could hang it on the wall and call it art, if you could just convince yourself to stop taking it down to play it! Since day one, Weber mandolins, mandolas, octaves and mandocellos have been eye candy,...

Mandolin Body Shapes and Sound Holes

Mandolin Body Shapes and Sound Holes

By Michael Eck The simple fact of the matter is that you can play anything you want on your Weber mandolin, regardless of which you’ve chosen. If your hands are ready and you’ve done your homework and you have the right attitude, you can play jazz, bluegrass, folk, klezmer, classical, whatever you please. But it’s also true that certain body shapes and sound hole configurations lend themselves to specific musical modes, and tradition, too, plays a hand in how your eye hears...

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